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Recipe| July 3 2021

I am a simpleton when it comes to beautiful cuts of beef. I just love letting great meat like this Westholme tomahawk speak for itself. Salt, pepper, smoke and heat: that’s all you need.  

I’ll bring in extra flavour through sauces and side dishes rather than marinades, so I serve this incredible steak with charred broccoli tossed with fried garlic-oregano vinaigrette and grilled sweet potato with crème fraiche and honey. It’s not complicated but it’s outrageously delicious. 

Serves 4 

Time 45 minutes, plus meat tempering time (30 minutes, approx.) and smoking time (30-40 minutes, approx.) 


Ingredients 

Steak 

1 Westholme tomahawk 
grapeseed oil, as needed  
kosher salt & freshly ground pepper, to taste 

Broccoli 

4 cups broccoli florets with stem, par-blanched for faster cooking  
3 tbsp olive oil  
2 tbsp grapeseed oil  
1 tbsp chopped garlic   
1 tbsp chopped oregano  
2 tsp chopped thyme  
1/3 cup cider vinegar  
2 tbsp sugar  
1 tsp wholegrain mustard   salt and pepper to taste  

Sweet potato 

4 medium sweet potatoes, par-baked in the oven until almost tender 
4 tbsp butter  
1/2 cup crème fraiche  
2 tbsp honey  
4 tbsp toasted pine nuts  
sea salt & black pepper, to taste   

METHOD 

Steak  

  1. Allow tomahawk to come to room temperature, covered, for about 30 minutes. 
  1. Pat steak completely dry, several times as needed.  
  1. Very lightly rub grapeseed oil on steak, not enough to drip off, just enough for the seasoning to stick.  
  1. Season liberally with salt and pepper all over. 
  1. Place on a pre-heated hot grill. Depending on what kind of grill you have, cooking directions will vary. I have a pellet smoker grill, so I start with a low smoke for 30-40 minutes and reverse sear on a hot grill. 
  1. After searing, remove steak from grill and rest (under a tent of foil, if you like) when you are 5-10 degrees from the desired temperature. I like medium-rare so I will cook it on the grill until the internal temperature is 49-50C / 120-122F, allowing for residual heat to bring it up to 53-54C / 128-130F.   

Broccoli   

  1. In a small pot, gently heat the olive oil and grapeseed oil.  
  1. Add garlic and cook until lightly golden.  
  1. Add the herbs and allow to sizzle for a few seconds.  
  1. Add vinegar, sugar, mustard, and season with salt and pepper. Cook for a few minutes on low heat until the sugar dissolves. Toss the grilled broccoli with the warm vinaigrette.   

Sweet Potato  

  1. Wrap each par-baked sweet potato in foil with 1 tbsp butter in each parcel.  
  1. Put on the grill in a spot without direct heat. Allow to finish cooking until tender.  
  1. To serve, split the sweet potato, add crème fraiche, pine nuts, drizzle with honey and sprinkle with sea salt and black pepper. 

Recipe| June 18 2021

Brisket takes time to prepare but very little effort: the marinade and the oven do all the work. When ready to serve – whether at home or in a restaurant – give the brisket a quick sear and slice, then let your guests get stuck in. 

Brisket is a full-flavoured secondary cut that becomes so tender after slow-cooking. For this recipe, we use bold, spicy flavours that play beautifully with pull-apart meat – they’re layered into the marinade then built up further with condiments and sides. 

Lettuce leaf wraps and a table full of ingredients mean people can assemble the dish themselves. It might get a bit messy but there’s no doubt it’s going to be delicious! 

Time 1 hour prep plus 24 hours marinating & 5-7 hours cooking  

Serves 8 (or more with extra brisket) 


Ingredients 

Meat 

1 Westholme brisket  
1 brining bag (see notes) 

Marinade  

1 cup gochujang (Korean chilli paste) 
1 cup sweet chilli sauce  
1 cup soy sauce 
1 cup brown sugar  
1/4 cup sesame oil  

Seasoning 

3 tbsp ground black pepper  
1/4 cup kosher salt  

Marinated cucumbers  

12 Lebanese (Persian) cucumbers  
1 cup rice wine vinegar  
1 cup water  
5 tbsp black vinegar  
4 tbsp chilli crisp (see notes) 
2 tbsp sesame oil  
1 tsp raw (turbinado) sugar  
salt, to taste  

Crispy shallots  

4 shallots  
2 cups canola oil  

Garnishes  

lettuce leaves, such as iceberg, gem or butter  
marinated cucumbers, recipe above  
crispy shallots, recipe above  
herbs, such as coriander (cilantro), mint, Thai basil  
crushed peanuts  
chili crisp, sriracha, black vinegar or other condiments of choice 

METHOD 

Marinade 

  1. Whisk all ingredients together. 
  1. Place brisket in brining bag with marinade and massage marinade into brisket. Marinate in refrigerator for 24 hours. 

Seasoning and cooking  

4. Preheat oven to 250C / 300F. 

5. Lay out two long sheets of foil next to each other. Crimp them together tightly to form one large piece of foil. Place this piece of foil on a sheet pan.  

6. Remove brisket from marinade and let excess drip back into the bag. 

7. Place brisket on foil and sprinkle half of the salt and pepper on each side. 

8. Use two more sheets of foil to make another large piece and place it on top of the brisket. Crimp the top and bottom piece together to form a big pouch for the brisket to cook in. 

9. Place in oven and cook for five to seven hours, until internal temperature of largest part of the brisket reads 90C / 200F on a meat thermometer. 

10. Remove brisket from oven and let cool to room temperature. At this point, brisket can be chilled, ready for guests. Bring back to room temperature before grilling. 

11. When ready to serve, portion brisket into steak-size slabs, char on a hot grill, slice and serve with lettuce and garnishes. 

Marinated cucumbers  

12. Slice cucumbers into rings and add to a bowl with rice wine vinegar and water. Let sit for 30 minutes. 

13. Strain and add remaining ingredients. 

Crispy shallots  

14. Slice shallots into rings as thin as possible, preferably using a mandolin. 

15. Heat canola oil in saucepan. Add a sliver of shallot to test oil. When shallot sizzles, the oil is ready. 

16. Add shallots to hot oil and stir to break up. Continue to stir and adjust heat until shallots are golden brown. 

17. Remove shallots from oil with a slotted spoon onto paper towels to drain. 

Notes 

  • A brining bag is a heavy duty plastic bag with a seal. Without a brining bag, you can place brisket and marinade in a sealable container to brine. 
  • Chilli crisp is a Chinese condiment, available in Asian grocers. 

Recipe| June 13 2021

There’s nothing quite as classic as a tenderloin roast and we give it the royal treatment here, serving it with wild mushrooms, buttered hasselback potatoes and an easy red wine jus. 

Time 1 hour 30 minutes 
Serves 4 


Ingredients 

1 Westholme wagyu tenderloin  
olive oil  
salt and pepper, to taste  
butter, as needed  
6 or so garlic cloves   
few sprigs thyme  

  1. Preheat oven to 175C/350F.  
  1. Remove silver skin (the thin, shiny surface membrane) from tenderloin and cut just below the ‘head’ or main part of the fillet, removing the thin tail portion. Reserve for tartare or other preparation. You will be left with a 30cm/12 inch approx. tenderloin roast.  
  1. Tie the roast with butcher’s twine and season all over with salt and pepper.  
  1. In a hot cast iron pan, add a drizzle of olive oil to coat the pan and add the tenderloin. 
  1. Sear the tenderloin on all sides until well browned. 
  1. Place the pan in the oven and cook for 10 minutes. 
  1. Remove pan from oven and place over medium-high heat. Add a healthy chunk of butter, a few sprigs of thyme and some crushed garlic cloves in their skin. 
  1. As the butter melts, baste the tenderloin with the butter and roll the tenderloin around in the melted butter, garlic and thyme.  
  1. When internal temperature reaches 50C/120F, remove tenderloin from pan and allow to rest 10-15 minutes before slicing.  
  1.  Serve with sauteed wild mushrooms, hasselback potatoes and red wine jus (see below). 

Sautéed Wild Mushrooms  

1/2 shallot, minced  
4 cloves garlic, thinly sliced  
3 tbsp olive oil  
4 cups wild mushrooms, such as shiitake, hedgehog, chanterelle, oyster etc 
2 tbsp thyme leaves  
salt and pepper, to taste 
2 tbsp chopped parsley  

  1. Saute shallots and garlic in olive oil until golden brown.  
  1. Add mushrooms and thyme leaves.  
  1. Stir and season with salt and pepper.  
  1. Continue cooking on high heat until mushrooms are softened and fragrant. 
  1. Adjust seasoning and add parsley. 

Hasselback Potatoes  

8 medium-size Yukon gold potatoes (Bintje is a good substitute) 
115g (1 stick) butter, melted  
coarse salt and pepper, to taste  

  1. Heat oven to 175C/350F. Cut thin slices into the potatoes being careful not to cut all the way through. 
  1. Place potatoes on a sheet pan or in a cast iron pan. 
  1. Brush melted butter all over the potatoes, ensuring some melted butter drizzles between the slices. 
  1. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and bake for about an hour, basting every 20 minutes with the hot butter in the bottom of the pan. Serve when golden and crispy. 

Red Wine Jus  

2 cups chicken stock  
2 cups beef stock  
2 cups red wine  
red wine vinegar  
salt and pepper, to taste  

  1. Combine beef and chicken stock in saucepan and simmer over medium heat until reduced by half.  
  1. Reduce red wine by half over medium heat in a separate saucepan.  
  1. Once reduced, combine everything and simmer for 5 minutes.  
  1. Adjust seasoning with a dash of red wine vinegar and salt and pepper if desired. 

Recipe| June 13 2021

The flank is cut from the abdomen and is prized for its big flavour and firm texture. It takes on spices and marinades beautifully and is often used in Mexican tacos and French steak frites. A hardworking cut, it needs a little more chewing, so ensure you cut it against the grain to shorten the fibres. Another hot tip for flank perfection is to take it out of the fridge at least 30 minutes before cooking to allow the muscle fibres to relax before hitting the grill. For this recipe, make the marinated peppers and chimichurri before cooking the steak.  


Ingredients  

Steak 

1 Westholme flank steak  
2 tbsp coriander seeds  
2 tbsp cumin seeds  
2 tbsp fennel seeds  
2 tbsp black peppercorns  
olive oil, to taste 
kosher salt, to taste 

Marinated peppers  

6 red capscium (bell peppers)  
olive oil, as needed  
sherry vinegar, to taste  
coarse salt 
freshly ground pepper  

Chimichurri  

2 bunches flatleaf (Italian) parsley  
4 cloves garlic  
1 tbsp chilli flakes  
2.5 cups olive oil  
salt  
red wine vinegar  

Method 

Steak 

  1. Heat grill.  
  1. Crush spices in mortar and pestle.   
  1. Rub flank steak with olive oil and season with salt on both sides.  
  1. Sprinkle half of the crushed spices onto one side of the flank steak and press into the meat with your fingers. Repeat on the other side. 
  1. Grill steak over hot fire on both sides until cooked as desired. 
  1. Serve with bread, olives, marinated peppers and chimichurri (see recipes below). 

Marinated peppers  

7. Heat oven to 175C / 350F. Cut capsicum (peppers) in half lengthwise and remove white pith and seeds. Toss them in a little olive oil and lay cut-side down on lightly oiled oven tray (sheet pan). Cook about 30-45 minutes, until skin becomes wrinkled and flesh softens.  

8. Remove from oven and cover tightly with foil. Let sit for 30 minutes. 

9. When capsicum (peppers) are cool enough to handle, gently peel off the wrinkled skin. Tear them into their natural segments and layer side by side in a shallow dish.  

10. Drizzle a generous amount of olive oil over the peppers and sprinkle with sherry vinegar, salt and pepper. Move capsicum (peppers) around gently with a spoon or spatula to distribute the marinade. Allow peppers to sit at room temperature for an hour before serving. 

Chimichurri  

11. Finely chop parsley with a sharp knife.  

12. Chop garlic and add to parsley along with chilli flakes and olive oil.  

13. Add salt and red wine vinegar to taste. Stir to combine. 

To serve  

sourdough bread  

olives 


Westholme has partnered with leading Australian bartender Orlando Marzo to create three cocktails inspired by our wagyu. 

“People often think of cocktails as an aperitif or digestif but they’re so versatile – there are endless opportunities to drink them as part of a dining experience,” says Orlando, who was named Best Bartender in the World after winning the prestigious Diageo World Class cocktail competition in 2018.  

“When I match cocktails with wagyu, I think about the elegant, buttery, rich notes, those signature qualities that wagyu brings to the plate,” says Orlando. “I want to highlight those flavours and bring in other elements with the cocktails.” 

Different cuts and preparations allow for diverse cocktail profiles, adjusting flavour, acidity, temperature and even glassware. “When I think about the freshness and minerality of a wagyu tartare, I think of delicate Spritz elements, while for the more concentrated flavours of a charcoal-grilled ribeye, I move towards the rich, intense flavours of a Martinez,” says Orlando. 

Matching food and cocktails is always about looking for balance. “You reach a golden point when everything just works,” says Orlando. “The cocktail and the wagyu dish is in symbiosis and all the flavours are dancing together.”  

The true victory is finding a diner willing to try something new – and then love it. “The most exciting part of being a bartender is to see someone really happy about a special cocktail you made for them, particularly if it was an unexpected one,” says Orlando. “There’s nothing wrong with a classic red wine match, but I find that element of surprise so rewarding.” 

Westholme Spritz 

A typical spritz includes bitter Aperol, Prosecco and soda. We’ve retained the bitterness and fizz for our signature Westholme Spritz, and added layers of flavour by making a homemade herbaceous cordial.  

This is a refreshing drink that goes down easily. Fragrant mountain marigold brings tropical notes that evoke the Queensland rangelands, while lemon zest adds tart fruitiness. The spritz works beautifully with a wagyu tartare – try this one from Brisbane chef Adam Wolfers and this wagyu tataki from Sydney chef Clayton Wells. 

Orlando suggests you drink this without a straw to make it easier to engage with the heady aromas of the spritz. 

INGREDIENTS 

Mountain marigold and lemon cordial 
1 lemon 
20g (large handful) mountain marigold (or other herb, such as basil, lemon verbena or mint) 
200g (1 cup) sugar 
300ml (1.25 cups) water 
½ tsp citric acid 


Spritz 
50ml (2 oz) Saint Felix Bitter Citrus Aperitivo * 
15ml (½ oz) mountain marigold and lemon cordial (recipe below) 
100ml (3½ oz) sparkling wine, such as Prosecco 

To serve 

cubed ice 
orange zest 
mountain marigold sprig (or other herb), to garnish 

METHOD 

Mountain marigold and lemon cordial 

  1. Zest lemon, being careful not to include white rind. Put it in a jar with the rest of the ingredients. Stir and allow to macerate for 24 hours, stirring occasionally.  Strain, retaining liquid. 

Spritz 

  1. Place aperitivo, cordial and sparkling wine in a glass.  
  1. Add ice and stir gently. 
  1. Garnish with orange zest and herb sprig. 

Notes 

  • Orlando uses an aperitivo from Australia’s Saint Felix, which includes indigenous ingredients such as lemon myrtle and rosella flower. Campari or Aperol are great substitutes. 
  • Leftover cordial will keep for weeks in the refrigerator. Use it to make more spritzes or simply dilute with soda for a virgin refresher. 

Glentana Highball 

When looking for a drink to pair with grilled ribeye, most people would reach naturally for red wine. Our Glentana Highball, named after one of our Westholme stations, is a less conventional match, with dry floral notes which enhance the smooth minerality of our Australian wagyu.  

Whisky brings a smokiness which plays with the flavour of the grill, while the citrus notes – from lemon juice and yuzu soda – bring a freshness which amplifies and cuts through the richness of the ribeye. Try this reverse-seared rib-eye recipe from Tim Hollingsworth. 

INGREDIENTS  

30ml (1 oz) Starward whisky * 
15ml (½ oz) Lillet Blanc * 
15ml (½ oz) lemon juice 
10ml (2 tsp) simple syrup 
lemon wedge  
cubed ice 
yuzu soda * 

METHOD 

  1. In a cocktail shaker, add whisky, Lillet, lemon juice, syrup, lemon wedge and a scoop of ice. Give the drink a short, sharp shake. 
  1. Strain into a chilled highball glass, fill it with ice and top with yuzu soda. 

Notes 

  • Starward Whisky is made in Melbourne, Australia but you can use any single malt whisky. 
  • instead of Lillet Blanc, use any aromatised wine or vermouth 
  • simple syrup is a 1:1 mix of sugar and water. To make it, combine 2 cups water and 2 cups sugar and stir or shake to dissolve sugar. Store in a squeezie bottle or jar in the refrigerator. It keeps indefinitely. 
  • yuzu is a Japanese citrus; if you can’t find yuzu soda, replace with soda water and a dash of lime juice, or grapefruit soda. 

Mitchell Martinez 

Orlando Marzo’s twist on the Martinez is named after Mitchell grass, an Australian plant that nourishes our herd on the Queensland and Northern Territory rangelands. Our Mitchell Martinez has concentrated fruit flavours which meld beautifully with the roasted, caramelised notes of our wagyu tenderloin or striploin.  

The cocktail is stirred with ice then poured into a chilled glass – having a cold drink next to wagyu, rather than room temperature wine, is also part of the experience. The play of heat from the wagyu and cold from the drink allows the melting nature of the wagyu to be experienced anew with each bite. 

Try the Martinez with Nina Compton’s seared New York strip

INGREDIENTS 

30ml (1 oz) Saint Felix Wild Forest Gin 
30ml (1 oz)  Sweet Vermouth 
10ml (2 tsp) Palo Cortado Sherry 
5ml (1 tsp) Luxardo Maraschino cherry liqueur 
orange zest 

METHOD 

  1. Place gin, vermouth, sherry and cherry liqueur in a cocktail shaker. Add ice and stir. 
  1. Strain cocktail into chilled sherry glass. 
  1. Spritz with an orange ‘coin’ (a circle of orange zest).  

Notes 

  • Orlando uses a gin from Australia’s Saint Felix, which has pine notes thanks to the use of mastic gum. You can replace it with your favourite gin.  
  • Palo Cortado is a Spanish sherry; it can be replaced with Amontillado or Oloroso sherry. 

Recipe| January 20 2021

Photo by Tanveer Badal

Chinese-born Los Angeles-based chef Mei Lin’s Lunar New Year menu includes three wagyu-focused dishes to launch the Year of the Ox.  

Photo by Tanveer Badal

It’s a heartfelt meal, imbued with Mei’s careful, considered, no-waste approach to cooking and eating meat. She uses wagyu three ways, making the most of the fillet, trim and fat. Rump cap (coulotte) is grilled and served with a lucky tangerine sauce. Trim from that dish is mixed with eggplant and sticky rice and steamed in lotus leaves to form flavourful parcels. And rendered wagyu fat is used to season wok-tossed vegetables.  

Not only are each of these dishes delicious, they are linked by a common ingredient – our wagyu – and Mei’s philosophy.  



 

This is the fifth video in our Resetting the Table series, showing top chefs rethinking special occasions for challenging times. It’s a time for nostalgia and hope, remembering times past and forging a bold future. In Mei’s case, she talks us through some of the New Year traditions she grew up with while presenting a meal that speaks to today. 

 

Mei is owner and chef of Los Angeles’ Nightshade restaurant, which is currently closed due to the pandemic.  

Grilled Wagyu with Tangerine Sauce  

Photo by Tanveer Badal

Our wagyu rump cap (also known as coulotte or picanha) is beautifully marbled with a fat cap that renders beautifully on the grill. For her Lunar New Year menu Mei Lin serves it with a tangerine sauce. Tangerines (and oranges) are considered lucky in China because their name (cheng) sounds the same as the word for ‘success’. 

“Tangerine beef is traditionally a stir-fried dish with tangerine peel and ginger,” says Mei. “But this is my version. Instead of doing a stir fry, I do a kind of blend between a roast and a grilled steak. We use a roasting cut, the coulotte (or rump cap), cut into quarters and seared on the grill, then warmed through in the oven to a perfect medium rare.” The tangerine element is tweaked too. “Instead of a high-sugar marinade, I confit the tangerine peel to create an aromatic syrup and infuse it into a sauce with ginger, garlic, shallots and soy.” 

Mei uses a small Japanese charcoal grill known as a konro (or shichirin or hibachi). The konro uses binchotan charcoal, which is pure, porous and burns to a white ash. It’s prized for its clean burn and fragrant smoke. This style of cooking works wonderfully well for wagyu but if you don’t have a konro, you can use a barbecue or cast iron pan. 

Serves 8 people 

Time: 1 hour (plus 1 hour confit tangerine peel)  

Ingredients

Wagyu

1 piece rump cap (also known as coulotte or picanha), approx. 1.5kg (3.3lb) 
kosher salt 

Confit Tangerine Peel

8 tangerines * 
2 cups white sugar 

Tangerine Sauce

2 tbsp vegetable oil 
8 Thai shallots, trimmed 
8 garlic cloves, finely sliced 
3 tbsp ginger, peeled and finely sliced 
500 ml (2 cups) Shaoxing wine 
2 cups reduced tangerine juice (start with 3 cups and reduce to 2 cups) 
⅛ cup dark soy sauce 
⅛ cup confited tangerine peel 

Method

Wagyu 

  1. Preheat oven to 95C (200F). Carefully score the fat cap, cutting on the diagonal to create 1cm (½ inch) squares, ensuring you only cut into the fat, not the meat itself. 
  1. Portion meat into four large chunks and season each piece very well on all sides with kosher salt. 
  1. Set your konro grill with binchotan ¾ full on one side and heat until it’s red-orange in colour. Place the steak on the grill rack and let it brown for about a minute. Quickly flip to the other side for another minute so that it browns evenly. If there is any flare up, move the meat to the other end of the grill so it can relax away from the heat. You want to brown all sides of the steak and bring it to rare. 
  1. Place wagyu on a rack over a tray and transfer to the preheated oven until it reaches medium-rare, with an internal temperature of 54-57C (130-135F), or to your liking. (You can reserve rendered wagyu fat that drips onto the tray for Yu Choy recipe below.) 
  1. Remove meat from the oven and rest in a warm place for at least 10 minutes before slicing and dressing with Tangerine Sauce (recipe below). 

Confit Tangerine Peel 

  1. Peel the tangerines with a vegetable peeler and cut the peel into thin strips. 
  1. Place into a medium saucepan, generously cover with cold water and bring to the boil. Boil for five minutes, then drain. 
  1. Place sugar and 2 cups water in saucepan and bring to a simmer. Add peel and simmer for 20-30 minutes. Transfer peel and liquid to a jar and store in refrigerator. 

Tangerine Sauce 

  1. Heat a heavy-bottomed saucepan until it starts to smoke. Add oil, shallots and garlic, stirring until they start to turn golden-brown and toasty. Ensure they don’t darken too much because they will taste bitter. 
  1. Add ginger, stir, and then add the wine to deglaze. Reduce heat and simmer to burn off the alcohol, cooking for about 5 minutes. 
  1. Add the tangerine juice and cook until nice and glossy, with a thicker consistency. 
  1. Finish with dark soy and ⅛ cup confited tangerine peel. Stir to meld flavours, then spoon generously over sliced wagyu on a serving platter. Serve extra sauce at the table. 

NOTES 

  • If you can’t find tangerines, they can be replaced with oranges (6) or mandarins (8). 
  • The Confit Tangerine Peel can be made up to a week ahead of time. 

Wagyu Eggplant Sticky Rice in Lotus Leaf 

Photo by Tanveer Badal

“This is kind of like my Chinese rice tamale,” says Mei. She trimmed the rump cap (coulotte) before grilling it for the tangerine dish, above, and saved the trim for these sticky rice parcels. “I try to use everything in its entirety and minimise waste,” she says. “I sauteed the wagyu with eggplant, garlic and dark soy, teamed it with sticky rice, folded it together and steamed it in a lotus leaf.” 

Makes 10 parcels 

Time: 1½ hours, plus 4 hours rice soaking and 1 hour lotus leaf soaking 

Ingredients 

2 cups glutinous rice * 
1 tbsp grapeseed oil, plus extra for brushing 
1.5 cups wagyu fillet, in 2cm (½ in) dice 
2 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 
1 tbsp ginger, minced 
4 long eggplants, cut into small pieces and sprinkled with salt 
1 tbsp sugar 
½ cup Shaoshing wine 
2 tbsp dark soy sauce 
2 tbsp oyster sauce 
½ tsp ground white pepper 
½ cup shallot tops or scallions, sliced 
5 whole lotus leaves, soaked in warm water for 1 hour, rinsed, stems trimmed, and cut in half  

Method

  1. In a medium bowl, soak the sticky rice in cold water for at least 4 hours, then drain.  
  1. Using a steamer, steam the sticky rice for 15-20 minutes. Set aside to cool. 
  1. Over high heat, add 1 tbsp grapeseed oil to a saute pan. When the pan is smoking slightly, add the wagyu and stir until browned 
  1. Add garlic, ginger and eggplant. Saute until browned, tender, and most of the moisture has evaporated. 
  1. Add sugar and quickly deglaze with Shaoshing wine until the alcohol burns off. 
  1. Add soy, oyster sauce, pepper and shallot tops and stir through. 
  1. Mix wagyu mixture with the cooked sticky rice.  
  1. Now you’re ready to make your lotus leaf wraps! Brush a thin layer of oil on a small section of one end of each of the 10 leaf halves. Put about ¾ cup of the mixture on the oiled area. Wrap each into a rectangle. 
  1. Steam in a bamboo steamer for 30 minutes. Enjoy straight out of the steamer. 

Notes  

  • Baking parchment can be used instead of lotus leaves. 
  • Glutinous rice is often sold as ‘Thai sticky rice’. 
  • Rice can be made a day ahead.

Yu Choy with Rendered Wagyu Fat and Salted Soybeans  

Mei Lin – Chef / Lifestyle / Food Photographer, Los Angeles – Westholme Beef Wagyu – Tanveer Badal Photography

Photo by Tanveer Badal

“I love rendering fat – especially roasted fat – and adding it to my vegetables or my rice,” says Mei. “You just get so much flavour. Growing up, the food in our household was vegetable based – you might have one small meat dish among a lot of different vegetables. It’s definitely in my nature to use meat carefully.”   

Serves 8, as part of a shared banquet 

Time: 20 minutes, plus 30 minutes soaking greens 

Ingredients

2 bunches yu choy (or bok choy or choy sum) 
1 strip wagyu fat, reserved from rump cap (couloutte), or use drained fat from grilled wagyu recipe, above 
3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced 
2 tbsp salted soybeans * 
½ cup Shaoxing wine 

Method

  1. Submerge greens in ice-cold water for at least 30 minutes to freshen up the leaves. 
  1. Over a medium-high heat, render the wagyu fat in a wok or saute pan until it begins to resemble bacon.  
  1. Turn the heat down to medium. Add garlic to the fat and fry until the cloves are golden brown, but not burnt. This will flavour the fat. 
  1. Add the yu choy and stir so that each stalk gets a light coating of the garlic-flavoured oil. 
  1. Add the salted soybeans and wine and immediately cover. Let the vegetables steam for 1½-2 minutes until tender. The yu choy should still be bright green and the stalks should be tender but with a nice bite. 
  1. Remove greens with tongs and place on a platter; top with other ingredients from pan. 

Notes 

  • Yu choy, bok choy or choy sum can all be used for this dish. 
  • When cooking fresh vegetables, the heat of your wok should stay at medium to medium-high. If it’s too hot, the broth may evaporate too quickly and your vegetables may burn. If it’s too low, your vegetables will cook too slowly and lose their bright green colouring. You can cook other vegetables the same way, adjust the amount of liquid as necessary. Thicker stems need more liquid and more steam time. 
  • Salted soybeans and Shaoxing wine are available from Asian grocers. 

Recipe| February 8 2021

Photo by Nikki To

Braising cuts like boneless short rib or rump cap are perfect to use for curry. As the wagyu slowly cooks the flavours meld with the spices, with the meat becoming tender enough to tear with a fork, and the rendered fat creating a rich gravy.  

This Thai-style curry works beautifully with the fresh tropical crunch of the Zesty Green Papaya Salad. 

Matt Moran cooked this dish for actor Meyne Wyatt on his Kitchen Tales cooking show. 



Serves 4  as main course

Time: 4 hours and 15 minutes

Ingredients

2 Westholme wagyu short ribs, boneless *
150ml (⅔ cup) grapeseed oil
2cm (⅘ in) ginger, peeled and roughly sliced
2cm (⅘ in) galangal, peeled and roughly sliced
2 garlic cloves, peeled and roughly chopped
1 red chilli, seeds removed
2 birdseye chillies
50g (3 tbsp) palm sugar, grated
1 cup chicken stock
1 lemongrass
400ml (14 oz) coconut cream
400mls (14 oz) coconut milk
1 tbsp fish sauce
1 cassia bark *
1 star anise
1 cup pea eggplants, picked off stem *
4 apple eggplant, cut into quarters *
½ kaffir lime, zested
4 kaffir lime leaves, torn

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 160C (320F). 
  1. To make the curry paste, place ⅔ of the grapeseed oil into a food processor with the ginger, galangal, garlic and chillies. Blend to a smooth paste. 
  1. To prepare the short rib, use a sharp knife to cut it into 4cm (1½ in) cubes.  
  1. Place braising pan on a high heat and add remainder of the grapeseed oil. Once oil is hot, add the cubed meat and sear until golden brown on all sides. Remove short rib from the pan and set aside. 
  1. In the same braising pan, add the curry paste and cook for 3-4 minutes constantly stirring until the paste has caramelised.  
  1. Add palm sugar and continue to cook for a further 2 minutes, deglazing the pan by adding chicken stock.  
  1. Cut lemongrass into 4cm (1½ in) lengths and crush with the back of a knife to release the flavour. Add lemongrass, coconut cream and milk and stir through.  
  1. Add fish sauce and return seared short rib to the pan. Bring curry to a gentle boil, add cassia bark and star anise.  
  1. Cover with a lid, place into the preheated oven and allow to cook for 3 hours or until the meat is tender and the sauce has thickened. 
  1. Once the curry is cooked, remove from the oven, add eggplants, lime zest and leaves. Place the lid back onto the pan and allow the eggplants to cook for 15-20 mins on a low heat until tender. Remove from heat and allow to rest for 15 mins before serving with steamed rice and Zesty green papaya salad.  

Notes

  • Rump cap can also be used for this dish. 
  • Cassia bark can be replaced with a cinnamon stick, if desired. 
  • If you can’t find Asian eggplants, use long Lebanese eggplants and cut into 2cm (1 in) dice. 

Steamed Rice

Serves 4  as a side

Time: 25 minutes

Ingredients 

2 cups jasmine rice  
2 cups water  

Method

  1. Place rice and water into a medium-sized saucepan. Place a lid on the saucepan and cook over high heat for 5 minutes, then reduce to a low heat and leave for a further 10 minutes. 
  1. Turn off heat and leave for 5-6 minutes until all liquid is absorbed. 


Zesty Green Papaya Salad

Serves 4 as a side

Time: 25 minutes

Ingredients

Salad 

½ green papaya, peeled and seeded   
1 green mango, peeled  
1 punnet cherry tomatoes, halved 
handful green beans, trimmed   
50g (4 tbsp) salted peanuts, roasted  
½ bunch coriander, leaves picked  
½ bunch mint, leaves picked  
½ bunch Thai basil, leaves picked   

Lime & chilli dressing  

½ red chilli, seeded and finely chopped   
2 tbsp palm sugar, grated   
1 tbsp fish sauce  
⅓ cup lime juice (from approx. 6 limes) 

Method

Salad 

  1. Bring a saucepan of salted water to a boil, add the beans and cook for 2-3 minutes until just tender. Strain the beans and place into iced water to refresh. 
  1. In a large mixing bowl, place the cooked beans, cherry tomatoes and roasted peanuts. 
  1. Use a mandolin to thinly slice the green papaya and green mango, then use a sharp knife to thinly cut them into strips. Place sliced papaya and mango into bowl with beans.  

Dressing 

  1. Place all ingredients into a small saucepan and bring to a simmer until the palm sugar is dissolved. Remove from heat and allow to cool. 
  1. Just before serving, add the picked herbs and gently mix. Pour the dressing over the salad. 



Recipe| January 20 2021

Photo by Tanveer Badal

Nina Compton’s approach to food is infused with multiple cultural influences, just like New Orleans itself. “Everything I do in my restaurants showcases my Caribbean beginnings, my roundabout 20-year journey to New Orleans and, of course, all the rich traditions and ingredients we have here. It’s all about time and place.” 

New Orleans is a great place for a food lover. “One of the things I love about New Orleans is that the entire city is excited about food all the time,” says Nina. “As a chef, that is the best thing you could ask for.” 



 

She loves showcasing premium ingredients from elsewhere for food lovers in her hometown. “Westholme wagyu is beautiful,” she says. “I am in love with that striploin. It’s the steak I could have everyday. If I had to choose my last meal on earth it would be steak frites and that would be my steak. The marbling, the nuttiness, the earthiness and the rounded flavours, the crust when you sear it – it’s not too fatty, not too lean, it’s just perfect.” 

Nina Compton owns Bywater American Bistro and Compere Lapin in New Orleans. 

 

Seared striploin (New York strip) with pecan gremolata and sorghum butter

Photo by Tanveer Badal

When I’m cooking a premium product like Westholme wagyu, I just want to keep it simple. Westholme takes so much time and care to raise these cattle – I want to showcase that. A little bit of salt, rosemary, garlic and olive oil and I’m ready to go. 

The sorghum butter and pecan gremolata echo qualities that I love in this meat: the sorghum picks up on the sweetness and the pecans add another layer to the nuttiness of the wagyu. 

Serves 4  

Time 2 hours 

Ingredients

Sorghum butter
1 large onion, finely sliced
1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
½ cup softened butter
1 tsp liquid smoke *
½ cup parsley, finely chopped
½ cup sorghum syrup *
1 tbsp coarse sea salt

Pecan Gremolata 
1 clove garlic  
1 cup extra virgin olive oil 
½ cup parsley, finely chopped 
1 lemon, zest finely grated    
2 tbsp pecan nuts, finely chopped  

Striploin 
4 x 280g (10 oz) Westholme striploin / New York strip  
salt   
freshly ground pepper 
2 cloves garlic, crushed 
2 sprigs rosemary 
2 tbsp softened butter 

Method

Sorghum butter

  1. Preheat oven to 180C (360F). Toss sliced onion in a roasting pan with olive oil. Cook for around 45 minutes or until very soft. Set aside to cool then finely chop. 
  1. Mix butter, onions, liquid smoke, parsley and sorghum syrup. Set aside to cool and set. 

Pecan gremolata

  1. Microplane the garlic into a small sauce pot, then add the olive oil. Gently warm over medium heat, cooking the garlic without letting it colour. When garlic is soft, remove from heat and allow to cool. 
  1. When cool, add the parsley, zest and pecans and a pinch of sea salt. 

Striploin

  1. Heat a cast iron pan on high heat. Season the steak generously with salt and pepper. Sear the steak for about 4 minutes on each side.  
  1. Continue to sear, then add the garlic, rosemary and butter. Continue to cook while basting for 2 more minutes.  
  1. Remove steak and set aside on a place to rest. Smear 3 tbsp of sorghum butter over steak while resting. Leave for 3 minutes, then slice.  
  1. To serve, add more butter, top the steak with pecan gremolata and sprinkle with sea salt.  

Notes

  • Butter can be made in advance. Excess butter can be rolled into log shapes, wrapped in baking paper and foil, then frozen. 
  • If you have a smoker, you can smoke onions and omit liquid smoke. 
  • Replace sorghum syrup with corn syrup, maple syrup, golden syrup or molasses. 

Roasted sweet potatoes with jerk-spiced butter

We grow sweet potatoes at home and this spiced butter goes so well with them. You’ll have plenty of butter left over: roll it up and freeze it for the next tray of roast vegetables or grilled meats.  

Serves 4  
Time 1 hour 10 minutes 

Ingredients 

4 x 230-280g (8-10 oz) sweet potatoes, washed well  
6 cloves garlic 
1 tbsp olive oil  
3 tbsp cayenne pepper 
2 tsp onion powder   
2 tsp thyme   
2 tsp sugar   
1 tsp ground cumin   
2 tsp salt   
1 tsp paprika   
1 tsp ground allspice   
½ tsp ground black pepper    
½ tsp ground nutmeg   
¼ tsp ground cinnamon   
2 cups butter, softened 
4 tbsp chives, finely chopped  

Method

  1. Preheat the oven 180C (360F). Place sweet potatoes on a sheet tray or in a heatproof dish. Toss garlic with a little olive oil and wrap in foil. Roast potatoes and garlic for 1 hour. 
  1. In a large bowl, combine all dry ingredients and then fold in the softened butter and roasted garlic. 
  1. Once the potatoes are tender, cut a slit and smear in some spiced butter. Top with chives and serve. 


Malfatti ricotta and spinach dumplings

‘Malfatti’ means ‘badly made’ and means that it’s perfectly fine if your dumplings are a little misshapen. Get a head start on this recipe by drain the ricotta the day before you make them. If you’re not serving the malfatti with the steak, they are also delicious with burnt butter and sage.  

Serves 4-6  

Time 1 hour 30 minutes, plus overnight ricotta draining 

Ingredients

450g (1 lb) ricotta
900g (2 lb) spinach or 450g (1 lb) frozen spinach, very well drained
1 tsp kosher salt, plus more to taste
1 cup flour, plus extra for dusting
½ tsp freshly grated nutmeg
4 egg yolks
1 egg
freshly ground pepper, to taste
8 tbsp butter
2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
2 cups heavy (pouring) cream
Parmesan cheese, freshly grated, to taste
½ cup panko breadcrumbs

Method

  1. Put ricotta in a cheesecloth-lined strainer set over a bowl and let drain overnight in the refrigerator. (If you don’t have cheesecloth, you can also use a new, damp kitchen cloth, doubled over.) Measure 1¼ cups drained ricotta and reserve any remaining ricotta for another use. 
  1. Wilt spinach in a large pan, cooking over medium heat until soft, around 3-4 minutes. Transfer to a colander to drain and cool. When cool, squeeze hard with your hands to expel more liquid. Transfer spinach to the centre of a clean tea towel, fold up tightly and squeeze to expel remaining liquid. Finely chop cooked, dried spinach. 
  1. Transfer spinach to a large bowl with drained ricotta, 1 tsp salt, flour, nutmeg, egg yolks, and egg. Season with pepper and mix until smooth.  
  1. Test one dumpling to check consistency: bring a small pot of water to the boil. Spoon out 1 tbsp of mixture, roll in extra flour and boil until the dumpling floats. If dumpling falls apart, stir ¼ cup extra flour into the mixture. 
  1. Using a spoon, divide mixture into 40 pieces, roll into balls round and dust with flour. 
  1. Transfer dumplings to a lightly floured baking sheet as you go. (If not cooking immediately, cover and freeze malfatti for up to 6 months.) 
  1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil and add dumplings, cooking in batches for 1-2 minutes until they float.  
  1. Meanwhile, heat butter in a skillet over medium-high heat. Add sliced garlic, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned.  
  1. Add the cream and salt to taste, then add the cooked dumplings and simmer until nice and coated. Garnish with Parmesan cheese and breadcrumbs to serve.



Recipe| December 15, 2020

Photo by Tanveer Badal

Suzanne Goin has been battling to save her Los Angeles’ restaurants since March with her staff foremost on her mind. “It’s been a distressing emotional rollercoaster,” she says.   

In that context, celebrating the holidays isn’t the first thing on her mind, though she will take a day to pause and spend time with loved ones around a shared table. This year’s gathering with immediate family and two close winemaker friends features beloved produce and simple dishes that awaken childhood memories. 



 

While Suzanne was growing up, the Goin family’s holiday table always featured a joint of beef. This year Suzanne will prepare Westholme wagyu, grilled on the plancha and served with greens and a punchy harissa vinaigrette. “I love it,” says Suzanne. “It’s different from traditional wagyu, which can almost be like foie gras in its richness. With Westholme, you get the richness and incredible texture but it’s still meaty and clean and beefy, with a sweetness at the end. I almost feel like I can taste the range where it’s been living. It tastes very pure.” 

Suzanne Goin owns two Los Angeles restaurants, AOC and Tavern, plus Lucques Catering and two The Larder stores. 

 

Westholme wagyu Manhattan strip steak with radicchio, Bloomsdale spinach and harissa vinaigrette 

Photo by Tanveer Badal

I love this cut – it’s a nice, manageable piece for home, easy to cook and manage. I season it with kosher salt and black pepper, plus sea salt on one side, and I cook it on a really hot cast-iron plancha. I like to sear it really well on one side to get a nice crust, then turn it over and let it coast. 

I slice the meat and serve it over half-wilted greens with a harissa dressing. I like a bit of spice and acidity with steak, and the bitterness and crunch of the greens. It’s all about balance. 

Serves 4
Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients

4 Westholme wagyu Manhattan strip steaks
2 small heads radicchio, torn into leaves
120 grams (¼ lb) Bloomsdale spinach, destemmed and cleaned
3-4 tbsp harissa vinaigrette (recipe follows)
½ lemon, juiced
kosher salt
freshly ground black pepper
fleur de sel or salt flakes, optiona;

Method

  1. Season the wagyu with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper on both sides, preferably 15 minutes before cooking, then leave out of the refrigerator to come to room temperature. If you like you can also use fleur de sel on one side of the meat, pressing it in gently. 
  1. Heat a plancha or cast iron pan for a few minutes until very hot. There is no need to use oil or butter to cook the meat – the marbling means that the wagyu easily forms its own crust.  
  1. Cook on one side until you have a deep, caramelised crust then turn the meat over, shut off the heat and let the meat sear on the second side but then slowly ‘coast’ to medium rare. This whole process should take 5 to 6 minutes. Rest the wagyu on a rack for a few minutes. 
  1. Meanwhile toss the radicchio and Bloomsdale spinach with the harissa vinaigrette, salt, pepper and a squeeze of lemon juice. Taste for seasoning. Arrange the greens on a platter. 
  1. Slice the wagyu and arrange the slices among the leaves of spinach and radicchio. Spoon a little more harissa vinaigrette over and around the meat and greens. 

Notes

  • Bloomsdale spinach has thick, crinkly leaves. Use regular English spinach or other leaves as an alternative. 
  • Kosher salt has a fairly fine but not powdery grain; you can substitute with any fine salt. 
  • Fleur de sel is crystalline sea salt. 

Harissa Vinaigrette

This dressing is pretty potent with bold flavours like ancho chilli and sherry vinegar. I toss it through the greens and add a little more as a dressing over the plated wagyu. 

Time 20 minutes
Makes 1 1/2 cups

Ingredients 

2 ancho chillies *
2 cloves garlic 
1½ tsp salt
1 canned tomato, halved and seeds scraped out and discarded
1 tsp paprika
½ tsp ground cumin
½ tsp ground caraway seeds
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
2 tbsp sherry vinegar
1 cup extra virgin olive oil
squeeze lemon juice 

Method

  1. Remove stems from chillies, tear them open, remove the seeds, and then place them in a bowl. Pour over boiling water to cover. 
  1. Pound garlic in a mortar and pestle with 1½ tsp salt. 
  1. Add the tomato and crush with the garlic. 
  1. When the chillies are cool enough to handle, drain them and pound them with the tomato and garlic in the mortar and pestle. Transfer to a bowl and whisk in the cumin, caraway, red wine vinegar and sherry vinegar. Then whisk in the olive oil and season to taste with lemon juice. 

Notes

  • Ancho chillies are a dried form of green poblano chilli. They can be bought in spice stores and Mexican grocers. 

Crushed fingerling potatoes with crème fraîche and chives 

Photo by Tanveer Badal

Sourcing is very meaningful to me – I like to know the people behind the food I’m eating. I get my potatoes from a local farmer called Alex Weiser – the magic in his produce is somewhere in there between the soul and the soil. There’s respect, dedication, time, and it all goes into the flavour.  

This recipe is super simple but it’s a real crowd pleaser, using the potato water to create a buttery emulsified sauce. 

Serves 4
Time 40 minutes 

Ingredients

700g (1½ lb) fingerling potatoes *
4 tbsp unsalted butter
few sprigs flat-leaf parsley, leaves chopped
¼ cup crème fraîche
20 chives, snipped into 1cm (½ in) lengths
kosher salt
cracked black pepper 

Method

  1. Place the potatoes in a large pot, cover generously with cold water and add 1 tbsp salt. Bring to a boil, turn down the heat, and simmer gently for about 15 minutes until the potatoes are tender when pierced. Reserve a cup of the water and strain the potatoes. 
  1. Return the potatoes to the pot and turn the heat on to dry them for a minute before adding the butter and ½ tsp salt. Stir to coat the potatoes with the butter and add a few tablespoons of cooking water to moisten the potatoes and create a little buttery sauce to coat them.  
  1. Taste for seasoning and stir in the parsley. 
  1. Spoon the potatoes into a large bowl and top with the crème fraîche, chives, and cracked black pepper. 

Notes

  • Fingerling potatoes are small, slightly elongated potatoes. Kipflers are one type of fingerling.


Roasted cauliflower with anchovy black olive butter 

Photo by Tanveer Badal

Serves 4-6

Ingredients  

1 small head cauliflower 
1 tbsp picked thyme leaves 
6 tbsp extra virgin olive oil 
4 spring onions, shallots or young green onions, greens attached * 
handful sprouting broccoli,  broccolini or young broccoli 
⅓ cup anchovy black olive butter (see above) 
1 lemon, juice only
kosher salt and freshly ground pepper 

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 200C (400F). Cut cauliflower into 6 or 8 wedges leaving the core intact so each wedge holds its shape.  
  1. Place the wedges on an oven tray (sheet pan) and brush with 2 tbsp olive oil. Season with salt, pepper and half the thyme. Roast in the oven about 15 minutes until the cauliflower is tender and slightly caramelised. 
  1. Meanwhile, trim the root end (but leave the root intact) and any brown or less than beautiful part of the greens from the onions. Toss onions in 2 tbsp olive oil, season with salt, pepper and the remaining thyme and place on an oven tray (sheet pan) or baking dish. Cook 10-15 minutes until tender and slightly caramelised. 
  1. Heat a large saute pan over medium heat, wait one minute and then swirl in 2 tbsp olive oil. Add the broccoli to the pan, season with salt and pepper and toss gently for a few minutes in the oil.  
  1. After 3 minutes, or when you can see the broccoli is beginning to cook, add the anchovy black butter and toss well to coat. Cook a few more minutes until the broccoli is just cooked. Turn off the flame, season with lemon juice and taste. 
  1. Arrange the wedges of cauliflower on a platter. Place the onions in and around the wedges. Pile the broccoli up on top, spooning any anchovy butter left in the pan around the other vegetables. 

Notes 

  • Suzanne uses long-stemmed young green onions, called ‘spring onions’ in the US. Use any tender green onion.  

Recipe| November 8, 2020

Photo by Tanveer Badal

“These are some of our family’s favourite dishes. For this cowboy (bone-in rib-eye), we smoke it at a low temperature then sear it in a cast-iron skillet over a wood barbecue. The smoke, the caramelisation, and then the addition of butter, garlic and thyme all build a depth of flavour. This cooking style is called ‘reverse sear’ because you start by slowly bringing up the internal temperature, then finish by searing the outside of the steak over high heat – we’ve been loving this technique with steaks. 

Westholme is special – it really has its own thing going on. You’re eating tender wagyu but at the same time you have that beefy flavour. It’s distinctive in the way it’s balanced. 


 


 

If I think steak, I think potatoes. I’m a potato guy. I legitimately crave them! For this barbecue I made a version of Farmer’s Potatoes, layering them in a cast-iron pan in a rosette pattern, spiralling them up over and again with shallots, garlic and thyme and a little butter sprinkled throughout. 

 

We also do a simple salad with tomatoes, corn and rosemary blossoms. We slice and season the tomatoes then let them sit to concentrate the flavour and let them leach out a bit of liquid which becomes part of the dressing. I toss through some raw, sweet, starchy corn and sprinkle rosemary blossoms over the top. The little flowers have a really nice herbaceous note.  

The acidity and brightness of a salad is important with rich red meat – they work together, actually. Those super clean, vegetal aspects and the garden-fresh taste make me want to keep going back to the steak.”

Timothy Hollingsworth is the chef and owner of Otium, Los Angeles. 

Serves 6
Time: 3 hours


Reverse-Seared Steak

Photo by Tanveer Badal

Serves 6
Time: 3 hours

Ingredients

1 thick-cut cowboy / bone-in rib-eye steak
1 tbsp sea salt *
1 tbsp black pepper, coarsely ground
3 tbsp olive oil
4 tbsp butter
1 bunch thyme
3 cloves garlic, crushed

Method

  1. Season steak with salt and pepper, reserving for some for finishing. 
  1. Smoke at 74C (165F) until internal temperature reaches 38C (100F). Without a smoker, cook in a low oven at the same temperature to achieve the same internal temperature.  
  1. Heat cast iron plate or pan, add oil, and sear steak on both sides. 
  1. Add butter, thyme and garlic, basting and turning as needed until steak reaches internal temperature of 49-54C (120-130F). 
  1. Remove from heat and allow steak to rest for 15 minutes.  
  1. Slice to serve, finishing with remaining salt and pepper.  

Notes

  • Tim’s preferred sea salt for this dish is ‘sel gris’, a grey French salt, also known as Celtic salt. 

Farmer’s Potatoes

Making this dish is a meditation as you slowly layer the slices of potato in a baking dish. Eating it is pure celebration. 

Ingredients 

15 Yukon Creamer potatoes, medium, thinly sliced * 
salt, to taste 
black pepper, freshly ground, to taste 
3 tbsp shallots, chopped 
3 tbsp garlic, chopped 
3 tbsp thyme, chopped 
½ cup butter, softened or tempered *  
½ cup chicken stock 

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 220C (425F). Combine shallots, garlic and thyme in a bowl. 
  1. Use a cast-iron pot or Dutch oven around 25cm (10 in) wide. Rub the bottom with butter. 
  1. Arrange the sliced potatoes in a spiral around the pan, starting at the edges and slowly working in. 
  1. Between each layer of spiral potatoes, season with salt and pepper, add a thin layer of the shallot mixture and a couple of dollops of butter. Do not add anything to the top layer of potatoes.  
  1. Add stock, then put lid on pot and cook for 30 minutes. Remove lid and cook for a further 15 minutes or until potatoes are fork tender and golden brown.   

Notes

  • Kipfler potatoes would also be good in this recipe. 
  • Tim tempers the butter. This means melting and whisking it so it stays liquid and milky without separating into butterfat and milk solids. You can omit tempering (it’s pretty cheffy!) – just use little dollops of soft butter between your potato layers. 

Rosemary-Scented Heirloom Tomato and Corn Salad 

Photo by Tanveer Badal

Raw corn is unusual but the kernels’ crunch and creamy starchiness work so well with sweet in-season tomatoes and bright, floral rosemary.  

Ingredients

900g (2 lbs) heirloom tomatoes, cored and cut in wedges  
1 tbsp sugar 
1 tbsp red wine vinegar 
salt flakes, to taste 
black pepper, freshly ground, to taste  
1 tbsp shallots, finely chopped  
3 ears sweet corn, kernels cut from cob 
1 tbsp rosemary, finely chopped  
4 tbsp olive oil  
2 tbsp rosemary blossoms, optional 


Method

  1. Place tomatoes on a serving dish, skin side down, then season with sugar, red wine vinegar, salt, pepper and shallots. Let marinate for 1 hour at room temperature. 
  1. Add corn, rosemary and olive oil. Gently toss.  
  1. Finish with rosemary blossoms, if using. Serve at room temperature or refrigerate for up to 4 hours before serving. 

Photo by Tanveer Badal

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