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Recipe | Oct 27 2021

We’re excited to share Ludo Lefebvre’s recipe for steak with pepper sauce.

Steak au poivre is one of the world’s classic bistro dishes. It’s usually made with eye fillet (filet mignon) but Westholme’s compact and tender Manhattan filet is perfect. The fine marbling in the wagyu helps form a beautiful crust on the steak with a crispness that persists even after it’s drowned in creamy, Cognac-spiked pepper sauce.

Serves 4


Ingredients 

Steak

4 x 170 grams (6 oz) Westholme Manhattan Filets
kosher salt
freshly cracked black pepper
grapeseed oil

Au Poivre Sauce

1 tbsp butter
3 cloves garlic, crushed
1 sprig rosemary
¼ cup Cognac
1 cup beef stock
1 cup crème fraiche
2½ tsp black peppercorns, coarsely ground
1½ tbsp brined green peppercorns (Madagascar brand)
1½ tsp fleur de sel

METHOD 

Steak

  1. Heat oven to 180C / 350F. 
  2. Heat up a cast iron skillet. Season the filet with kosher salt and black pepper.
  3. Heat grapeseed oil in the skillet until hot and sear the filet for about 4 minutes each side.
  4. Remove the steak and let rest in a warm place for at least 5 minutes.
  5. Spoon the Au Poivre sauce (see recipe below) over top of the steak completely covering it.
  6. Crack black pepper on top of the filet and serve with green salad or French fries. 

Au Poivre Sauce

  1. In a small pan, add butter and saute the garlic and rosemary until fragrant.
  2. Add the Cognac and cook off the alcohol over medium heat.
  3. Stir in the beef stock and crème fraiche and continue to simmer for about 5 minutes.
  4. Strain the sauce into a pot and add the black peppercorns and green peppercorns. Simmer for 5 minutes.
  5. Finish with fleur de sel.

Recipe | Sep 13 2021

Is there anything like roast beef, carved at the table for enjoying with friends and family? This standing rib roast – also known as export rib – is a whole bone-in ribeye. It’s an incredible cut for roasting: meat on the bone stays juicy and tender and the finely marbled fat in our wagyu renders as it cooks and rests.

We’ve served it in classic style with roasted carrots, crispy potatoes, peas and Yorkshire pudding. You’ll need a muffin tin to bake the puddings and please note this batter needs to sit for an hour.

Serves: 4-6
Time: 2 hours


Ingredients 

Wagyu

Westholme 4-rib bone-in ribeye roast 
olive oil
salt and pepper 

Roasted Carrots

900g (2 lb) carrots 
6 sprigs thyme
olive oil
salt and pepper

Crispy potatoes 

7 Idaho or russet potatoes
olive oil
salt

Peas

900g (2 lb) peas, fresh or frozen
butter
salt and pepper 

Yorkshire pudding 

1 cup flour 
1 cup milk 
3 eggs 
1.5 tsp salt 
beef fat from roasting ribeye 

METHOD 

Wagyu

  1. Heat oven to 180C / 350F. 
  2. Rub roast all over with olive oil and season generously with salt and pepper.
  3. In a large cast iron pan, heat a drizzle of olive oil and sear roast on all sides until nicely browned. 
  4. Transfer roast to a roasting pan with a rack and place in oven. 
  5. Roast until internal temperature is 52C / 125F (about 15 minutes per 450g / 1 lb). 
  6. Remove roast from the oven and let rest for 20 minutes in a warm place.
  7. Serve with roasted carrots, crispy potatoes, peas and Yorkshire puddings. 

Roasted Carrots

  1. Heat oven to 200C / 400F. 
  2. Scrub carrots but don’t peel. 
  3. Toss carrots with a little olive oil, thyme sprigs and salt and pepper. 
  4. Place everything on a sheet pan and roast 15 minutes. 
  5. Use a spatula to turn carrots over and roast for another 15 minutes or until slightly caramelised and tender. 

Crispy potatoes

  1. Heat oven to 200C / 400F. 
  2. Peel potatoes and cut into large chunks.
  3. Add potatoes to a large pot and rinse off starchy water.
  4. Cover potatoes with water and generously salt the water. 
  5. Bring potatoes to a simmer and cook until almost tender. 
  6. Pour potatoes into colander and shake them until they look a little raggedy.
  7. Drizzle a generous amount of olive oil onto a sheet pan and tip potatoes on sheet pan.
  8. Sprinkle on a little salt and put in the oven for 20 minutes. 
  9. After 20 minutes give them a stir and drizzle with a little more olive oil.
  10. Continue cooking and stirring until the potatoes are golden brown all over, about an hour. 

Peas 

  1. Blanch peas in boiling salted water.
  2. Drain and toss with butter, salt and pepper.

Yorkshire puddings

  1. Heat oven to 230C / 450F. 
  2. Mix salt into flour. 
  3. Whip eggs and milk together.  
  4. Stir in flour and 3 tbsp wagyu fat. 
  5. Let batter sit for 1 hour. 
  6. Add 1 tbsp beef fat to each muffin tin. 
  7. Place muffin tin on a sheet pan and place in hot oven for 5 minutes.
  8. Carefully remove sheet pan from oven and divide batter among muffin tin cavities so batter comes up about halfway. 
  9. Return to oven and bake until golden brown and crispy, about 25 minutes. 

Recipe | Sep 8 2021

“This is a BBQ love story for the ages,” says Kristen Kish of our grilled bavette.

Bavette – also known as flank and similar to skirt – is cut from the abdomen. It’s a more textured steak than many fillets and it loves generous seasoning and a very hot cook followed by a long rest. You can use the same technique and accompaniments for other wagyu cuts.

When steak is as good as Westholme, Kristen loves to keep it simple and bring in complementary flavours and textures with sauces and sides. This chilli-spiked crushed green olive sauce and the sweetcorn salad have colour and verve and are easy to prepare before you cook the steak.

Serves: 6-8
Time: 1 hr, plus 30 minutes steak tempering and yoghurt smoking


Ingredients 

Bavette

1 Westholme bavette
olive oil
salt and pepper

Crushed Olive Sauce

1 cup olive oil
3 cloves garlic
3 sprigs rosemary
1 cup green pitted olives, drained and crushed
1 tsp chilli flakes, such as Aleppo pepper
6 spring onions / scallions, grilled and finely chopped
1 tbsp honey
2 tbsp red wine vinegar
salt and pepper, to taste
feta, to serve

Sweetcorn, Snap Pea and Smoked Yoghurt Salad

3 cups corn kernels, from 5-6 corn cobs (or use frozen)
1 ½ cups snap peas, destringed, sliced
2 tbsp grapeseed oil
2 tbsp shallot, finely chopped
1 tsp garlic, grated
2 tsp fresh thyme leaves, chopped
1 tsp lemon zest
1 tbsp lemon juice
2 tbsp basil, torn
1 tbsp mint, torn
1 tbsp olive oil
1 cup smoked yoghurt (see below)
salt and pepper, to taste

Smoked Yoghurt

1 cup Greek yoghurt
smoking wood of choice (I like mesquite)

METHOD 

Bavette

  1. Allow steak to come to room temperature, covered. This will take about 30 minutes. Pat steak completely dry with paper towels and trim excess fat.
  2. Very lightly rub grapeseed oil on steak, not enough to drip off, just enough for the seasoning to stick.
  3. Season liberally with salt and freshly ground black pepper, seasoning more heavily on the thicker parts of the bavette.
  4. Cooking will vary, depending on type of grill. I have a pellet smoker grill so I sometimes do a low smoke for 30-40 minutes then reverse sear on a hot grill. When grilling, ensure the grilling surface is preheated and place the oiled, seasoned steak down, flat-side first. Turn it a few times during the cooking process, which will take 18-22 minutes, depending on the heat of the grill. I like medium-rare so I will cook until the internal temperature in the thickest part is 49-50C / 120-122F, allowing for carry-over cooking to take it to 53-54C / 128-130F.
  5. Remove steak from grill and set aside, tented with foil if it is in a cool place. Carve with the grain to portion, then against the grain to slice and serve.

Crushed Olive Sauce

  1. Heat olive oil gently then add whole garlic and rosemary sprigs and continue to heat. When the rosemary sizzles, turn off heat and steep for 10 minutes, before removing rosemary and garlic.
  2. Pour the infused oil over the crushed olives. Add chilli flakes and grilled spring onions / scallions.
  3. Meanwhile, melt honey and vinegar together in a small pot. Pour into olive mixture, add salt and pepper to taste and feta at the last minute.

Sweetcorn, Snap Pea and Smoked Yoghurt Salad

Yoghurt

  1. In a shallow container, spread yoghurt out, exposing as much surface area as possible.
  2. Place that container in a larger container with smoking chips in an aluminum foil nest. Light wood chips then blow them out to generate smoke.
  3. Cover tightly and allow to sit at room temperature for 25-30 minutes. Depending on how much smoke you want, you can relight and create more smoke halfway through the process. This can be done earlier on the day of cooking but is best done on the same day.

Salad

  1. Lightly cook corn in salted, simmering water, drain and refresh in iced water, then drain. Super fresh corn can also be served raw.
  2. Toss with other ingredients.

Recipe | Aug 27 2021

Sydney chef Mat Lindsay from fire-focused Ester restaurant and his partner and fellow chef O Tama Carey from Lankan Filling Station host an Australian barbecue for friends. Wagyu is used four ways: there’s koji-marinated T-bone, pastrami-spiced intercostal skewers, tallow flatbreads and wagyu fat salted caramels, plus a bunch of vegetable sides. “The classic Aussie barbecue I grew up with was burnt sausage, white bread and tomato sauce,” says Mat. He’s stepped it up just a little bit for this feast, which is mostly cooking over the charcoal-fired parrilla on his terrace. “We still burn it a little bit,” says Mat, who specialises in wood-fired cooking at Ester. “A bit of burn is good. We want to highlight the fact that you can do more with wagyu than a plain grilled steak. We use different cuts, methods and techniques to make everything delicious.”


Recipe | Aug 24 2021

It might surprise you to think of it, but beef fat has a proud history on the dessert trolley – just think of the suet that gives puddings and mince pies their lightness at Christmas. These wagyu fat caramels are every bit as delicious.

Makes 1 tray caramels

Time 1 hour, plus 3 hours rendering and 2 hours setting


Ingredients 

Rendering

½ cup raw wagyu fat, chopped

Caramels

1 cup pouring cream
65 g (2.3 oz) rendered tallow, from raw fat, above
350 g (12.3 oz) caster sugar
80 grams (2.8 oz) glucose
3 tsp fine sea salt flakes


METHOD 

Rendering

  1. Place raw chopped fat in a saucepan and add a splash of water. Render over very low
    heat for 3 hours, or until fat has separated, melted and is clear and glossy. Strain,
    retaining liquid fat. This is your tallow.

Caramels

  1. Melt tallow (beef fat) and cream in a small saucepan stirring over gentle heat, then set
    aside.
  2. Put glucose, sugar and just enough water to moisten the sugar in a deep pot, and bring
    to the boil without stirring until it reaches 160C / 320F on a sugar thermometer.
  3. Take the glucose and sugar mixture off the heat and stir in the cream and fat.
  4. Heat the mixture, stirring occasionally so it doesn’t catch, till it reaches 121C / 250F,
    then stir in half the salt.
  5. Pour the caramel into a tray lined with baking paper. Sprinkle the remaining salt over the
    top.
  6. Sit uncovered at room temperature until it cools by which stage it should be set, about
    40 minutes.
  7. Cut with a hot knife into bite-sized pieces.
  8. Caramels can be kept for at least a week in an airtight container.

Recipe | Aug 24 2021

A good green sauce is a thing of beauty and is perfect served with any type of fatty meat. This one has a little celery in it which gives it a slightly different flavour and a bit of added texture. It will keep for a day or two in the fridge but is at its finest when freshly made.

Serves 6

Time 15 minutes


Ingredients 

100g (3.5 oz) celery cut into 1cm dice
2 garlic cloves, finely mashed
2 tbsp salted capers, washed and finely chopped
2 cups flat-leaf parsley, roughly chopped
1 cup mint, roughly chopped
1 cup dill, roughly chopped
fine zest of 1 lemon
½ cup delicate extra-virgin olive oil
salt flakes and black pepper, to season


METHOD 

  1. Blanch the celery in a pot of boiling salted water for five seconds or so, then refresh in iced water, drain and dry out on paper towels.
  2. Combine celery and all remaining ingredients in a bowl, mix well and season.

Recipe | Aug 24 2021

This salad is nice and crunchy with a good kick of horseradish. The herb mix is up to you; add or subtract your leaves and herbs as you choose, just as long as it remains fairly delicate.

Serves 4-6

Time 30 minutes, plus resting


Ingredients 

½ head of iceberg lettuce
3 tbsp grated fresh horseradish
3 tbsp mascarpone
2 tbsp water
1 lemon, juiced
salt flakes and white pepper, to season
1 cup picked watercress
1 cup picked round mint
1 cup picked flat-leaf parsley
½ cup chives, cut into 2cm lengths
½ cup picked chervil
½ cup picked dill
1 lemon
delicate extra-virgin olive oil, for dressing
salt flakes and black pepper, to season


METHOD 

  1. Remove the core of your iceberg, cut it in half and submerge in water. Let it sit for about 20 minutes, remove, and sit it cut-side down to strain over a rack in the fridge.
  2. Combine the horseradish and mascarpone in a small bowl. Add the water to thin it out and then season the mix with lemon and salt and pepper. You want your dressing to be thick yet still runny. It should have a sharp kick and good lemony tang. (If you make this ahead, it tends to thicken up, but you can just add a little more water to get the right consistency back.)
  3. Make sure your iceberg is dried out, then cut it into two wedges and lay it on a plate so it’s sitting flat. Pour the dressing over the iceberg, making sure it goes between all the leaves.
  4. Combine all of your herbs in a bowl and mix them together. Season them ever so gently and dress with just a splash of oil and lemon. You want to be as delicate as possible here to maintain the integrity of the herbs. Pile this herb mix on top of the iceberg. Serve immediately.

Recipe | Aug 24 2021

You can use your gas burner on the stove to blacken the eggplants, but, as always, live fire gives an unmatched depth of flavour to everything it touches. We like to serve this warm, or at room temperature, but definitely not cold.

Serves 6

Time 1 hour


Ingredients 

Eggplant

2 large eggplants
extra virgin olive oil
1 lemon
sea salt
freshly cracked black pepper

Seed mix

2 tbsp white sesame seeds, toasted
2 tbsp black sesame seeds, toasted
1 tbsp sunflower seeds, toasted
2 tbsp buckwheat, toasted
2 tbsp hazelnuts, toasted and crushed
1 tbsp sea salt

Labne

150g (5.3 oz) labne (store-bought or made using our recipe, below)


METHOD 

  1. Pierce the skin of the eggplants to stop them exploding on the fire. Over a high flame, grill the eggplants quickly all over. We’re not looking to cook the eggplants all the way through at this stage, we just want the skins completely burnt.
  2. Put the eggplants in a bowl and cover it tightly with clingfilm. Allow them to cool to room temperature. This does two things: allows the vegetable to finish its cooking gently, and it seals in the smoky flavours developed in the charring.
  3. When the eggplants are cool, peel and scrape off the burnt skins using your fingers or a small paring knife. The skin should come away easily, without too much damage to the flesh. Do not, repeat, do not rinse the eggplants with water. It’s better to be left with a little bit of skin on the eggplant than ruin its flavour and texture by getting it wet.
  4. Lay the eggplants out on a serving plate, and give them a little push here and there to make little places for the labne to nestle in. Season the flesh with a generous amount of salt and black pepper, then a good slug of the olive oil and a squeeze of the lemon.
  5. Mix all the toasted seeds, buckwheat, hazelnuts and salt together.
  6. Top the eggplant with the labne, then sprinkle over the toasted seed mix and serve.

Labne

Time 1 hour

This labne (hung yoghurt) will keep for at least a week in your fridge.

Ingredients 

1kg (35 oz) Greek yoghurt
1 tbsp sea salt
2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

METHOD

  1. Mix the salt and yoghurt together well.
  2. Line a colander or metal sieve with muslin cloth, then spoon the yoghurt into the centre. Draw the sides of the cloth up over to cover the yoghurt. Suspend the sieve or colander over another bowl to catch the whey.
  3. Leave for a night in the fridge (or two; it’ll get thicker the longer you leave it) to drain off the excess moisture in the yoghurt. You’re looking for something about the consistency of a very thick mayonnaise.
  4. Whisk the olive oil into the strained yoghurt and refrigerate until it’s ready to serve.

Recipe | Aug 24 2021

These little beauties have a delightful crust and the softest of interiors, all the things you want in a deep-fried morsel. The mix can be a little soft and hard to shape but they are well worth it. They are very good as is but even better dipped in a little hot sauce.

Makes around 25 croquettes

Time 1 hour, plus 12 hours resting time


Ingredients 

1.25L (2.6 pints) milk
200g (7 oz) cauliflower, broken into florets
2 tbsp whole black peppercorns
2 fresh bay leaves
175g (1 ½ sticks) unsalted butter
1 large brown onion
165g (5.8 oz) plain flour
85g (3 oz) cornflour
200g (7 oz) soft fontina cheese, grated
2 eggs, beaten
200g (7 oz) breadcrumbs
oil for deep-frying
sea salt


METHOD 

  1. Put the milk, cauliflower, peppercorns and bay leaves in a pot and bring to the boil. Turn down the heat and simmer until the cauliflower is just cooked but has not turned to mush.
  2. Strain out the cauliflower, reserving the milk for the croquettes. Keep the milk warm while you allow the cauliflower to cool enough to handle, then chop the cauliflower roughly into small pieces.
  3. In a clean saucepan, melt the butter over low heat, and sauté the onion until it’s softened but not at all browned.
  4. Stir in the flour then, combining it well, then add the cornflour a little at a time until it forms a smooth, thick paste.
  5. Now slowly stir in the warmed cauliflower-scented milk a little at a time. Once it’s combined, gently simmer the mix for approx. 30 minutes or until there’s no raw flour flavour, and the mix is thick and creamy.
  6. Remove from the heat and add the chopped cauliflower and grated cheese. Season to taste with salt. Cool, cover and refrigerate overnight.
  7. The next day, using floured hands, shape the mix into balls or ovals. When you’re ready to cook, bring oil for deep-frying to 180C / 350F, and place beaten egg in a bowl and the breadcrumbs on a plate.
  8. Dip the croquettes into the beaten egg and then the breadcrumbs, then deep-fry in small batches for 2 or 3 minutes or until golden brown. Drain the croquettes well on absorbent paper, season with salt and serve hot.

Recipe | Aug 24 2021

Intercostals are taken from between the ribs and they respond really well to brining. The flavour is exceptional!

The grill-and-glaze approach we’ve used here also works really well on beef tongue: braise it till
it’s tender, slice it thinly, and cook it quickly over the coals, slathering on the glaze as you go.
We love this served with Tama’s celery salsa verde, below.

Makes 10-12 skewers

Time: 30 minutes, plus marinating


Ingredients 

Waygu intercostals

1kg Westholme wagyu intercostals, trimmed of any sinew and scored

Pastrami brine

2L (4.2 pints) water
100g (3.5 oz) salt
80g (2.8 oz) caster sugar
6 fresh bay leaves
6 garlic cloves, crushed
4 tbsp whole black peppercorns
1 tbsp yellow mustard seeds
4 tsp cloves
4 tsp dried chilli flakes

Barbecue glaze

100ml (3.5 oz) HP sauce
30g (1 oz) Worcestershire sauce
2 tsp soy sauce (tamari is ideal)
30g (1 oz) honey
30g (1 oz) mustard
2 tbsp sesame oil
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 tsp ginger minced
1 tsp ground black pepper
1 tsp dried chilli flakes

To serve

Soft herbs
Julienned spring onion greens
Hot sauce
Pickles
Tallow flatbreads, to serve


METHOD 

Pastrami brine

  1. In a large bowl or food-safe bucket, stir together all the ingredients until the salt and sugar are completely dissolved.

Barbecue glaze

  1. In a large bowl, mix all the ingredients together until they’re completely combined.

Wagyu intercostals

  1. Place the intercostals in the brine, making sure they’re completely submerged, and leave them in the fridge overnight.
  2. Remove the intercostals from the brine, pat them dry, and let them sit uncovered in the
    fridge for at least an hour.
  3. Grill over charcoal (a medium fire is ideal), brushing with the barbecue glaze as you go,
    getting nice caramelisation and cooking the intercostal meat to a medium or medium
    rare. I don’t go too rare with these because there’s a lot of fat and connective tissue on
    the cut which needs to be cooked a little more. They don’t really need resting.
  4. Serve with soft herbs such as flat-leaf parsley, chives and chervil, julienned spring onion
    greens, tallow flatbreads (recipe above), Tama’s celery salsa verde (recipe below),
    pickles and hot sauce.

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